Entries by David Lee

Trevor Pinnock Interview

Meet renowned harpsichordist and conductor Trevor Pinnock, who directs Dunedin Consort for the first time next week in our performances of J.S. Bach’s Matthew Passion in Aberdeen and Edinburgh. Can you remember your first experience of the Matthew Passion? I well remember my introduction to parts of the Matthew Passion (in English!) as a choirboy at Canterbury Cathedral. I was especially taken by the […]

Apollo and Daphne — The Herald Review

★★★★Keith Bruce, The Herald8 February 2019 The composer’s plundering of Ovid and Petrach is a musical delight, and had the best balance of the musical forces we heard all night, with Katy Bircher’s flute joining the fine performance by oboist Alexandra Bellamy and eleven strings, led by Huw Daniel.  [T]he challenges of the chapel acoustic were overcome by […]

Apollo and Daphne — Seen and Heard Review

The Queen’s Hall, EdinburghSimon Thompson, 6 April 2019Seen and Heard International The fizz and crackle of the orchestral writing could only have come from a young genius on the make, and that jumped out of this Dunedin Consort performance, playfully directed from the harpsichord by an exuberant John Butt. The band of players was small […]

Bach Magnificat, Wigmore Hall — The Times Review

Paul Driver, The Times … a joyous New Year’s Eve of music by Bach from the Dunedin Consort, directed by John Butt. The original E flat version of the Magnificat in the second half was a captivating unfolding of short but vividly characterised choral or solo-voice movements, the Latin contrasting with the German of two […]

Beginning of the Revolution — Hunterian Museum, Glasgow — The Herald Review

★★★★Keith Bruce, The Herald Its [the music’s] intricacies were in good hands here, starting with the delicious interplay between the viols of Jonathan Manson and Alison McGillivray on a Jenkins’s Pavane and later including a virtuoso and melody-packed sonata by Benedetto Marcello played by Manson. Butt was in his solo element on Kuhnau’s David and […]

Bach Magnificat — Wigmore Hall, London — The Independent Review

★★★★★Michael Church, The Independent The Dunedin Consort, under John Butt’s historically-informed direction, gave a typically dazzling performance of Bach at his most ravishing. The second Orchestral Suite and the fourth Brandenberg Concerto, conveyed by just eight players, emerged with all the detail meticulously clear, while each of the eight voices in the motet “Singet dem Herrn ein neues Lied” contributed […]

Messiah — Glasgow, City Halls — The Herald Review

★★★★Keith Bruce, The Herald An interpretation of Handel’s Messiah that makes the listener aware of both the work’s musical and liturgical sophistication is a special thing, yet that is what the Dunedin Consort routinely achieves under artistic director John Butt. For the award-winning Scottish baroque vocal and instrumental ensemble, Messiah has become their Stairway to Heaven or Bohemian […]

Handel Ode for St Cecilia’s Day — Gramophone Review

Richard Wigmore, Gramphone [Carolyn Sampson’s] poised, invariably graceful contributions are among the disc’s prime pleasures: from her radiant sense of wonder in the sarabande aria ‘What passion cannot music raise and quell!’, in dialogue with Jonathan Manson’s musingly eloquent cello; through the wistful ‘The soft complaining flute’, where Sampson veils her naturally bright tone (a […]

Handel Ode for St Cecilia’s Day — AllMusic Review

All Music by Blair Sanderson Such sunny numbers as the chorus, ‘From Harmony’, the tenor’s martial aria, ‘The Trumpet’s Loud Clangour’, and the famous March, with its popular trumpet solo, give a clear indication of the predominantly joyous nature of the Ode. The Concerto Grosso in A minor, Op. 6, No. 4, also composed in 1739, […]

Handel Ode for St Cecilia’s Day — Financial Times Review

The Financial Times Soprano Carolyn Sampson and tenor Ian Bostridge are engaging soloists, Sampson sounding especially luminous. The Polish Radio Choir sings Dryden’s text with impressive clarity and the Dunedin Consort shines in the solo opportunities for cello, trumpet, flute and organ with which Handel hymns music’s sacred spheres. Read the full review here